New Country. New Business. New Life. AEOI & FATCA Part II

Where not to do business:

By Sbw01f [GFDL ( or CC BY-SA 3.0 (], via Wikimedia Commons
Percentage of People living on $1.00/day or less

We ended the first part of this discussion of inequality. While extreme equality isn’t needed to make a country a good place to do business, extreme inequality is a significant barrier to doing business in a country. That doesn’t mean that it isn’t a good place to settle down, but it does mean that must either concentrate on making your money elsewhere or concentrate on a business serving those who control the wealth.

This is the same table we presented in Part I of this essay:

Country Tax Percent
of GDP
HDI Ease Of
Doing Business
Inequality* 2025 Population Growth** Economic Freedom*** 2015 Real GDP Growth
New Zealand 27.8 0.913 1 0.362 5.6 3 3.00%
Singapore 13.5 0.912 2 0.464 0.7 2 2.00%
Denmark 34.8 0.923 3 0.248 0.7 18 1.00%
Hong Kong 12.5 0.910 4 0.537 -1.2 1 2.40%
Korea 13.9 0.898 5 .0302 -0.2 23 0.50%
Norway 22.4 0.944 6 .0268 3.4 25 1.60%
U.K. 25.0 0.907 7 0.324 2.2 12 2.20%
U.S.A. 11.4 0.915 8 0.450 3.0 17 2.50%
Sweden 43.3 0.907 9 .0249 2.2 19 4.20%
Macedonia 16.4 0.747 10 .0436 -1.6 31 3.20%

* The data isn’t available from a single source so Wikipedia has used a combination of CIA, World Bank and UN data. You can use the links on the Wikipedia site to get to the original data.

** Based on UN constant fertility forecast for the period 2025-2030. I selected this period because almost all population rates of growth are declining and if you are going to have a business, it is important to have an idea of whether you are enterenting a market that growing, static or shrinking. For comparison, the least developed countries have a forecasted birth rate of 27.3 births per thousand and that rate is increasing.

*** This data is from the Heritage Foundation which is a conservative political group in the U.S. that views the U.S. as a socialist state. (!) That should be borne in mind when interpreting the results…at least for the U.S. In any case, most of these countries rank fairly well on the scale of economic freedom.

Population Growth

Throughout the developed and developing world, the rate of population growth is dropping. In much of Eastern and Northern Europe as well as some other countries, the population is declining. We have not yet developed an economic system able to cope well with declining population. If you plan on doing business, you are far better off doing business in a country that is both prosperous and experiencing a reasonable rate of population growth. I’ve selected a date a bit into the future as it is important to know what is coming in this case, not what has passed.

It would probably be optimal to live in a society of zero population growth where there was full employment for everyone who wanted it as they were engaged in improving the quality of life rather than simply producing more and more stuff. Of the countries in this table, those showing positive growth are all reasonable choices based on this one criterion. Barring a change in economic systems in the next ten years the ones showing negative population growth should be avoided.

Economic Freedom

The following components go into the makeup of the Heritage Foundation calculation.  Heritage is not an honest broker so its judgement as to what exactly comprises economic freedom is skewed towards the Burkean ideal rather than that of Voltaire. Furthermore, they have an incentive to make the U.S. look bad when Democrats or moderate Republicans are in office.  That is something to keep in mind.

Property Rights Government Integrity Judicial Effectiveness Trade Freedom
Government Spending Tax Burden Fiscal Health Investment Freedom
Business Freedom Labor Freedom Monetary Freedom Financial Freedom

Real GDP Growth

This is a number that is fairly difficult to tinker with over the short term, but, of course, countries such as China have regarded it as just another piece of propaganda for so long that it is difficult to know what the actual facts are in their GDP reports. Having said that, the countries in our top ten are fairly consistent in their reporting methodologies year-over-year so we can be fairly certain that these growth numbers are real, even if their absolute GDP numbers may not be.

For lack of space we did not list Human Freedom or Polical Risk on the list at the top.  They appear below.

Political Risk

This is not a measure of political freedom. One can make a case that increased democracy brings with it increased political risk. Of course, one can say the same for totalitarianism. For business purposes, one doesn’t care particularly whether a country is democratic or autocratic, the one thing it must be is stable. So lower political risk is a measure of stability, not a measure of freedom.

Human Freedom

This may be the most important of all freedoms but, as business is defined today, it isn’t considered a necessary component although it is hard to point to any countries that have had long term business success without a great deal of human freedom. For that reason, we are presenting the scores here. First is a list of all the many indicators that are used and then the scores. You can download the report here:

Healthcare System Efficiency

WHO measures the health systems of the world to determine the quality and equity of the system in three areas, health outcomes, responsiveness and fairness in financing. From these they calculate a composite index which is what we display here. Because a poorly performing healthcare system adversely affects a country in numerous ways. It is an important measure to look at on its own, as we do here.

Best Countries to Live In

U.S. News & World Report uses sixty-three criteria to determine which the best countries are to live and work in. Among the criteria used for Entrepreneurship, for example, are: Provides easy access to capital, Well-developed infrastructure, Transparent business practices, Educated population, Skilled labor force, Entrepreneurial, and Connected to the rest of the world. These are just a few of the many scorings used. This is clearly an important adjunct to making your final decision as to where to live and to have a business.

Human Freedom Index
2016 Political Risk
WHO Health System Ranking
U.S. News Best Country Index
1. Hong Kong 92 n/a n/a
3. New Zealand 87 14 41
5. Denmark 82 34 12
6. U.K. 81 18 3
13. Norway 81 11 10
15. Sweden 88 23 6
23. United States 85 37 7
35. Korea 81 58 23
40. Singapore 91 6 15
55. Macedonia n/a 89 n/a


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One Response to New Country. New Business. New Life. AEOI & FATCA Part II

  1. says:

    While all countries are invited to join the new standard, the G20 and the Global Forum recognise that some developing countries facing serious capacity constraints will not have the resources to implement it on the same timeline as other countries.

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